Tinkering around the edges of permacrisis: Too little, too late

Green Party campaigners meeting on the city walls

York Green Party Reacts to Chancellors Autumn Budget Statement

Whilst reeling from the overall impact the Chancellor’s Budget Statement on 17 November 2022 revealed, York Green Party is trying to spot the silver, or should we say, green lining. Not an easy task.

‘This budget amounts to taking £30bn away from people who need it during a cost-of-living crisis – both directly and through cuts in services’, says Tom Franklin, Chair of York Green Party. ‘These cuts are not needed, if the government collected all the tax that is being avoided there would be £35 billion extra. The cuts are political choice by the government to transfer money from those of least able to pay to the richest.’

The Chancellor claimed to be embracing the government’s commitment to net zero, but the measures announced amount to little more than tinkering at the edges.

The energy efficiency package, promising £6bn of new funding from 2025 doesn’t go anywhere near as far and as fast as it should. Councillor Denise Craghill says: ‘City of York Council has made great strides in addressing energy efficiency in housing through the housing delivery programme and the retrofit programme, but this promise of not very much money in 2 years’ time does nothing to speed up the progress towards energy efficient homes that we need’.

‘The commitment only to the ‘core Northern Powerhouse Rail’1 project demanded by northern leaders remains at a level far short of what is needed’ says Green Councillor Andy d’Agorne. ‘If efficient public transport serving some of the key cities across the north does not have the highest priority for this Government, then this reveals the talk of levelling up as lip service,’ he continues.

‘We are disappointed to see only the vaguest of references to investment in renewable energy2 which does not mention onshore wind power specifically, nor does it mention tidal power projects’, says Andreas Heinemeyer, Green Party activist and Senior Research Fellow at the Stockholm Environment Institute at York University. ‘The only specific commitment to spending money on energy infrastructure relates to Sizewell C, a nuclear project which is rejected by many people as not being a realistic answer to energy security in either the short or the long term,’ he continues.

This is a budget that does not address, far less solve the crises we face: the climate crisis, the cost-of-living crisis, the energy crisis and the crisis of growing inequality in this country. And it leave local councils and local people with picking up the bill for the incompetence and ideology of this government.

1 P 33, Autumn Statement 17 November 2022, accessed at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1118429/CCS1022065440-001_SECURE_HMT_Autumn_Statement_November_2022_BOOK.pdf on 18 November 2022

2 P 32, Autumn Statement 17 November 2022, accessed at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1118429/CCS1022065440-001_SECURE_HMT_Autumn_Statement_November_2022_BOOK.pdf on 18 November 2022

Leave a comment

Skip to content